CSS: Cascading Style Sheets

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Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a stylesheet language used to describe the presentation of a document written in HTML or XML (including XML dialects such as SVG, MathML or XHTML). CSS describes how elements should be rendered on screen, on paper, in speech, or on other media.

CSS is one of the core languages of the open Web and is standardized across Web browsers according to the W3C specification. Developed in levels, CSS1 is now obsolete, CSS2.1 is a recommendation, and CSS3, now split into smaller modules, is progressing on the standardization track.

  • CSS Introduction

    If you're new to web development, be sure to read our CSS basics article to learn what CSS is and how to use it.

  • CSS Tutorials

    Our CSS learning area contains a wealth of tutorials to take you from beginner level to proficiency, covering all the fundamentals.

  • CSS Reference

    Our exhaustive CSS reference for seasoned Web developers describes every property and concept of CSS.

Tutorials

Our CSS Learning Area features multiple modules that teach CSS from the ground up — no previous knowledge required.

CSS first steps
CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) is used to style and lay out web pages — for example, to alter the font, color, size, and spacing of your content, split it into multiple columns, or add animations and other decorative features. This module provides a gentle beginning to your path towards CSS mastery with the basics of how it works, what the syntax looks like, and how you can start using it to add styling to HTML.
CSS building blocks

This module carries on where CSS first steps left off — now you've gained familiarity with the language and its syntax, and got some basic experience with using it, its time to dive a bit deeper. This module looks at the cascade and inheritance, all the selector types we have available, units, sizing, styling backgrounds and borders, debugging, and lots more.

The aim here is to provide you with a toolkit for writing competent CSS and help you understand all the essential theory, before moving on to more specific disciplines like text styling and CSS layout.

Styling text
With the basics of the CSS language covered, the next CSS topic for you to concentrate on is styling text — one of the most common things you'll do with CSS. Here we look at text styling fundamentals, including setting font, boldness, italics, line and letter spacing, drop shadows and other text features. We round off the module by looking at applying custom fonts to your page, and styling lists and links.
CSS layout
At this point we've already looked at CSS fundamentals, how to style text, and how to style and manipulate the boxes that your content sits inside. Now it's time to look at how to place your boxes in the right place in relation to the viewport, and one another. We have covered the necessary prerequisites so we can now dive deep into CSS layout, looking at different display settings, modern layout tools like flexbox, CSS grid, and positioning, and some of the legacy techniques you might still want to know about.

Reference

Cookbook

The CSS layout cookbook aims to bring together recipes for common layout patterns, things you might need to implement in your own sites. In addition to providing code you can use as a starting point in your projects, these recipes highlight the different ways layout specifications can be used, and the choices you can make as a developer.

Tools for CSS development

Meta bugs

See also