The extends keyword is used in class declarations or class expressions to create a class which is a child of another class.

Syntax

class ChildClass extends ParentClass { ... }

Description

The extends keyword can be used to subclass custom classes as well as built-in objects.

The .prototype of the extension must be an Object or null.

Examples

Using extends

The first example creates a class called Square from a class called Polygon. This example is extracted from this live demo (source).

class Square extends Polygon {
  constructor(length) {
    // Here, it calls the parent class' constructor with lengths
    // provided for the Polygon's width and height
    super(length, length);
    // Note: In derived classes, super() must be called before you
    // can use 'this'. Leaving this out will cause a reference error.
    this.name = 'Square';
  }

  get area() {
    return this.height * this.width;
  }
}

Using extends with built-in objects

This example extends the built-in Date object. This example is extracted from this live demo (source).

class myDate extends Date {
  constructor() {
    super();
  }

  getFormattedDate() {
    var months = ['Jan', 'Feb', 'Mar', 'Apr', 'May', 'Jun', 'Jul', 'Aug', 'Sep', 'Oct', 'Nov', 'Dec'];
    return this.getDate() + '-' + months[this.getMonth()] + '-' + this.getFullYear();
  }
}

Extending null

Extending from null works like with a normal class, except that the prototype object does not inherit from Object.prototype.

class nullExtends extends null {
  constructor() {}
}

Object.getPrototypeOf(nullExtends); // Function.prototype
Object.getPrototypeOf(nullExtends.prototype) // null

new nullExtends(); //ReferenceError: this is not defined

Specifications

Specification Status Comment
ECMAScript 2015 (6th Edition, ECMA-262)
The definition of 'extends' in that specification.
Standard Initial definition.
ECMAScript Latest Draft (ECMA-262)
The definition of 'extends' in that specification.
Draft  

Browser compatibility

Update compatibility data on GitHub
DesktopMobileServer
ChromeEdgeFirefoxInternet ExplorerOperaSafariAndroid webviewChrome for AndroidEdge MobileFirefox for AndroidOpera for AndroidSafari on iOSSamsung InternetNode.js
Basic supportChrome Full support 49
Notes
Full support 49
Notes
Notes From Chrome 42 to 48 strict mode is required. Non-strict mode support can be enabled using the flag "Enable Experimental JavaScript".
Edge Full support 13Firefox Full support 45IE No support NoOpera Full support 36Safari Full support 9WebView Android ? Chrome Android Full support YesEdge Mobile Full support 13Firefox Android Full support 45Opera Android ? Safari iOS Full support 9Samsung Internet Android Full support Yesnodejs Full support 6.0.0
Full support 6.0.0
Full support 4.0.0
Disabled
Disabled From version 4.0.0: this feature is behind the --use_strict runtime flag.
Full support 5.0.0
Disabled
Disabled From version 5.0.0: this feature is behind the --harmony runtime flag.

Legend

Full support  
Full support
No support  
No support
Compatibility unknown  
Compatibility unknown
See implementation notes.
See implementation notes.
User must explicitly enable this feature.
User must explicitly enable this feature.

See also

Document Tags and Contributors

Last updated by: msobanjo,